It’s hard to describe exactly what this video is, but it came from someone asking me if I make all these different changes without thinking about it… and the answer is that I do.
 
So I got to thinking about how I originally learned to switch between different boxes or scales or sounds and this is a run down of how to do it.
 
Hope you dig the video and get some ideas from it:
 
 

    17 replies to "How To Ingrain Moves"

    • Hennie

      Hi Griff,
      You have so much musical wisdom to offer your thousands of talented online students. But despite 5 years of trying and daily practicing, I still can’t play a song…the arthritis in my fingers doesn’t help. Since there may be others with desire and dedication like me, could I suggest a separate category of tips and online lessons aimed at guys like me in a “guitar for dummies “ type format.
      Thanks

      • Eddie Lee

        Sing, man… sing!

    • Dennis

      Fantastic session … it really put’s it in a good “mental model” for me and is a lesson I’m going to work with for a while!

    • william

      beautifully put

    • Robert C

      There again, you’ve created “another” light bulb moment Griff.
      You explain things so practical and easy to understand and just know this little lessons are fantastic. Also really enjoying the courses I finally was able to get, if I keep up my practice routine hopefully I can be at least 1/32nd as proficient as you in a couple of years 😂😎

    • Robert C

      There again, you’ve created “another” light bulb moment Griff.
      You explain things so practical and easy to understand and just know this little lessons are greatly appreciated. Also really enjoying the courses I finally was able to get, if I keep up my practice routine hopefully I can be at least 1/32nd as proficient as you in a couple of years 😂😎

    • Thomas Gracen

      This sounds so cool griff:

      I know box 1. Can you suggest a way to learn/practice
      boxes 2 thru 5?

    • Rob McNiff

      Excellent suggestion on practicing scales………bottom to top….as the bottom strings are more commonly used in soloing. Also a great way to memorize where different patterns/scales over lap.

    • Eugene R

      Griff,

      Every day I think “Wow, that is the best lesson yet from Griff. He will never have a better lesson for me. It’s just what I needed.”

      Then the next day you have another lesson that is exactly what I needed. Amazing!!

      Now I want you to help me manage my stock portfolio … 😊

    • Jim P.

      Wow, thanks Griff for opening up new doors. Didn’t think of doing this to make switching scales to match chords much easier. Can you also show us how this might work for major pentatonic scales? Similar concept?

    • Jack

      Hi, Griff.
      I can’t thank you enough. You just opened a door for me.
      I now have another thing to practice, which will raise my level of playing in a huge way.

    • John Rosenberg

      Well done Griff. I now feel sooo stupid for not doing this before. Makes perfect sense of course, and for some songs keeping in a similar range really suits the melody. Just tried it on some of your backing tracks for fun, and of course works great every time. Nice one!

    • Dennis Frakes

      Far out Griff….this is something that has been an issue that I did not know how to solve and boom – you fixed it.
      AS always – thanks for your guidance and dedication to your students – it is truly appreciated.

    • Skip

      Great lesson. Been moving around like you showed jumping from Am to Em. Did not think about using a different position to play Em. A whole new ball game. Thanks Griff.

    • Paul

      Hi Griff, As always a good useful lesson, as I was watching I was thinking for things like this it would be useful if you could add a download of the loop you are using for those who don’t have a looper to practice over.
      Just a thought

      • fjdion23@yahoo.com

        Buy a looper. Best investment ever.

    • Bob Barker

      Excellent lesson, as always, Griff. Definitely will be incorporating this into my practice regime.
      Cheers

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