Texas Shuffle 10.2 Any tips?

Discussion in 'BGU Lessons 6-10' started by Doodlebug, Jun 2, 2020.

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  1. Doodlebug

    Doodlebug Blues boy.

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    Hi folks, how dam hard is this to get down?
    There’s a lot to do with the fingers of both hands. My question; do you approach it slowly to learn the fingering / damping techniques or just try and go full speed until it sounds about right?
    Obviously I’ll never be SRV but I’d like to nail it somehow.
     
  2. snarf

    snarf musician wannabe

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    I remember that one!! For me, that was probably the most frustrating (but rewarding) chapter in BGU. I think Griff says to practice it slow to get the technique and notes figured out, but it's going to sound beyond awful while you do that. Once you get the basics under your fingers, go ahead and, as he says in PSTM, butcher it loud and proud. I think I kept working on that one a few minutes a day for, literally, months. Then one day I went to practice it and I realized that it sounded like it was supposed to.

    Perseverance is the key to that lesson. It's one that definitely doesn't happen for most of us mere mortals overnight, and, if you're like me, will frustrate you to no end. I'm sure my wife was hating life some nights when I'd be in my music room proudly butchering this one before it finally started sounding right. But, because I stuck to this lesson long enough to really get it down, I have a buddy that heard me playing Pride and Joy once that now calls me Stevie Ray Snarf...and that makes me feel pretty good.

    Never fear, keep working on it, and you'll be Stevie Ray Doodlebug before you know it. (y)
     
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  3. jmin

    jmin San Francisco, CA

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    I think this is the SRV “Pride & Joy” lesson, right? ...very damn hard (at first). I do remember learning this in very small sessions over a few weeks (I’m a slow learner). You’re right about “a lot going on.” And if I recall Griff says to “just go for it!” Play it sloppy and try to reign in the unwanted noises. The only “tip” I’d have is to watch Stevie. I was surprised at how much of the muting is done by his left hand. You can really see him “pumping” the left hand on the neck for control.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4QnXqlTARk

    That’s my tip: Watch Stevie! (And just try to get it a little better everyday)
     
    #3 jmin, Jun 2, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2020
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  4. snarf

    snarf musician wannabe

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    That's what I remember him saying as well, and it's a great definition for "butcher it loud and proud."
     
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  5. Doodlebug

    Doodlebug Blues boy.

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    Thanks, I tried it again yesterday, slow at first and then a little faster, it’s akin to being a total beginner again. I guess it’s something I’ll have to keep practicing bit by bit until it falls into place.
     
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  6. dwparker

    dwparker Funky Blues Muther Funker

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    Yeah, this is a tough one and I really need to spend more time on it. When I review thus exercise and it actually sounds good, I've noticed I need to do my left hand muting, as already mentionen, fretting the notes with the middle of the pad on the first digit instead of the tip, letting my whole finger lay across the strings.

    I also need to watch my pick attack on my left hand. If you look at your pick orientation in you hand while strumming up, I keep this same pick orientation while picking down on the base string notes. I also find myself choking up on the pick, with as little of the pick point touching the strings as possible. But this is just me and I really spend a lot of time determing how best to hold the pick, angle of attack, the best direction to pick on the strings to get the sound I want or where I need to pick next. I am really about economy here, but also trying to treat my plectrum like a violinist treats their bow, manipulating the pick to get the tone and dynamics I am looking for.