Most important thing you've learned?

Discussion in 'BGU Questions' started by Grritz, Sep 30, 2020.

  1. Grritz

    Grritz Still seventeen... between the ears

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    I'm just new here and I know I have a lot to discover about BGU, but I have this one general question at this point: What is the most important think you've learned so far from your time at BGU?
    Thanks!
     
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  2. Paleo

    Paleo An Old Fossil

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    Whatever works for me is the "right" way to do it. :)
     
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  3. jmin

    jmin Student Of The Blues

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    Great question Grritz! ... and welcome to the BGU world! I'll have to drink about this one. It's a BIG question! I'll be back...
     
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  4. Zzzen Dog

    Zzzen Dog Blues Junior

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    My biggest "ah hah" moment to date with Griff's courses have been made within his course "How to Jam the Blues Alone", specifically the whole section on Blues in G. It gave me a huge boost in clarity surrounding the whole rhythm (including riffs) and lead thing, how they interact with one another and gave me a better ear for the timing of the two.

    As I jam to various blues tracks, that information, that feel is helping me to play better in time and mix of the track, as well as beginning to help me with phrasing, along with his other material out of BGU.
     
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  5. MikeS

    MikeS Allen, TX
    Staff Member

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    1) I'll quote Churchill..
    “This is the lesson: never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never"
    Often misquoted (but maybe more appropriate for guitarists) as Never Give up.
    Too may people work so hard then give up when they are just on the cusp of getting better, so Never Give Up!

    2) We learn better in short spurts. Practice something for 10-15 minutes, then move on to something else, then come back to the original thing.

    3) Oh yea... and counting out loud.
     
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  6. Grritz

    Grritz Still seventeen... between the ears

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    Thanks, Mike. Your advice about not giving up is absolutely correct.
    And I love Churchill. A great man, who helped to save western civilization. Later!
     
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  7. ChrisGSP

    ChrisGSP Blues Journeyman

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    Bends. Just about every lesson has at least one bend in it - concentrate on them. In my opinion, the "blue" in blues is the bends. It takes a long time to get them right, but keep working on them.
     
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  8. Many Moons

    Many Moons Biking+Blues=Bliss

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    Counting is the big one, then I think combining Major/Minor Blues sounds is a must for blues sounding music.
     
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  9. Iheartbacon

    Iheartbacon Blues Junior

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    The value of recording yourself. Record some of your practice time and pop into the virtual Jam room from time to time. I quickly heard a number of flaws in my playing that I did not hear when actively playing and that has helped me know where to focus my learning.
     
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  10. tommytubetone

    tommytubetone Student Of The Blues

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    This and using little chords.
     
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  11. jmin

    jmin Student Of The Blues

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    So far we got:
    1. little chords
    2. recording
    3. counting
    4. bends
    5. never give up...practice in short sessions
    6. jamming Blues alone
    7. whatever works for you is the right way
    Good list! When I discovered Griff I was really wanting to learn how to improvise a solo. So, I would have to say that learning the Pentatonic/Blues scale (the boxes) is the most important thing I've learned I'm learning.
     
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  12. PapaBear

    PapaBear Guit Fiddlier

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    I would add knowing what scales fit in or around each CAGED chord shape
     
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  13. Silicon Valley Tom

    Silicon Valley Tom It makes me happpy to play The Blues!

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    The most important thing I have learned from BGU is that there are some forms of the Blues that I do not like, and have no interest in. :eek: So I spend my efforts playing what I like, and that is what I enjoy! :):cool:

    Tom
     
  14. Grritz

    Grritz Still seventeen... between the ears

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    Precisely! I am becoming a disciple of Griff because my guitar teacher is NOT teaching me blues. Instead, he has me learning pop "girlie" songs like "Cherish" and "Groovin'" and "Brandy" and "You've Lost that Lovin' Feelin.'" These are all wimpy throwbacks and are certainly NOT blues. I'll be having a lesson with him in a few hours. I wrote him a note after my last lesson two weeks ago, telling him I don't want to learn any more wimpy stuff, but want to focus on the blues. I'll know in a few hours where that's gonna go. I'd like to keep him as my teacher but I have no qualms about dropping him and going completely with Griff if I need to. I'm 77 years old...I don't have time to do the stuff I don't wanna do!
     
  15. Silicon Valley Tom

    Silicon Valley Tom It makes me happpy to play The Blues!

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    Good for you! Go after what interests you.

    I have had a number of teachers, and have taught a good number of students. Having started my musical journey at age six, I have had a few teachers. I was so lucky! You see, teachers and doctors have something in common. About 85% of them are incompetent! When it comes to teachers, not all can teach you what you want. That is why I say at some point you have to become your own teacher.

    You decide what you want to learn. To find a teacher who is willing to do that is difficult. Most will want to teach you what they are capable of, which in all likelihood will be limited. No teacher will know all that you desire. That is too much to ask. However, the teacher should be honest enough to tell you his or her limitations, and you must be honest as to your expectations. First you must know what it is that you want to do, and then find a teacher who understands the subject well enough to teach it. You might end up with several teachers over a short period of time from each one, learn bits and pieces, use YouTube, and the many on line sources to gain the necessary knowledge to succeed. Always keep your goal in mind! Point yourself and your efforts in that direction.

    To me, the most important thing about learning a musical instrument is techniques. There are so many more things to learn, but if you cannot perform the basic techniques correctly, you will be limited in your ability to play an instrument. I play over a dozen instruments, and each one requires a different set of techniques. From there, you add other essential ingredients, such as timing, and the list goes on.

    Well, at age 78 I am still learning. Learning is fun and keeps me going.

    Tom
     
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  16. JPsuff

    JPsuff Satisfaction is complacency

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    I believe the thing that has helped me more than anything else is playing in a variety of genres.

    Blues, Jazz, Fusion, Rock, Latin and even some Metal from time to time all have things to offer in terms of learning and I'm fascinated by how so many styles of music share common things. For example I've found that one scale (Pentatonic minor) and one mode (Dorian) are quite common in all of the styles I mentioned and are in many ways interchangeable.

    I think that by dabbling in a variety of styles makes me a better Blues player because the things I learn in other styles, whether it's phrasing, or individual licks or just the speed and dexterity many styles demand can all be applied to Blues; making it more interesting and more fun to play. Trying out different styles takes me out of my comfort zone and forces me to play things I might never encounter if I just played Blues and once I gain some success at such things (which in some cases has taken weeks or even months), I end up being a better player and more confident in knowing that I have skills and chops that I can draw from at any time and that I didn't have before I started branching out.

    For instance, licks I've learned to play in "Hair Band" backing tracks often appear as little "flurries" in a Blues tune because the Hair Band stuff allowed me to gain the facility to call up those licks on demand. Or modal runs I learn to play in a Jazz Fusion track often work very well (in whole or in part) in a variety of Blues tracks and they add some dimension or drama to a track that may otherwise seem rather dull. And of course the Latin, Dorian and Pentatonic minor trio are an absolute must for when I get my Santana freak on! :Beer:

    I'm still sorting a lot of this stuff out and I often "over-play" things because there's so much stuff I like to try, but I know that as time goes by I'll figure out what to keep and what to leave out (hey, it worked that way for Clapton, so I'm in good company). But overall, having too many things to play around with is always better than having too few and I think of it as a good problem to have.

    I call it my "2x4 theory" which postulates that it is better to have a 2x4 that's too long and can always be cut down to fit, than to have one that's too short and will never fit no matter how much I wish it would.;)


    (...now where's that Afro rhythm track I was messin' with the other day...?) :whistle:
     
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  17. JohnHurley

    JohnHurley Rock and Roll

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    That i should have worked harder at counting my first year playing guitar thats number one probably.

    Second that its never too late to start improving your counting.

    Third thing the amount of time you spend practicing does pay off eventually.

    Zero ... have fun!!