Chord by Chord course

Discussion in 'Everything Else...' started by Mr.Scary, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. Mr.Scary

    Mr.Scary A Blues Legend in My Own Mind

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    So I just broke open this course and I am practicing your arpeggio for the E,A,C shape .There is a major, a minor , and( dominant ) 7th arpeggio so my question is when do I use which one. If Griff explained somewhere I must have missed it somewhere cuz I don't know which scale to use over what? Or can I mix and match.
     
  2. PapaBear

    PapaBear Guit Fiddlier

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    I would start by using them over the same chord, major over major, minor over minor...
     
  3. Paleo

    Paleo Work?

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    The idea is NOT to use scales.

    You solo over each chord in a progression using notes in the chord, i.e. arpeggios.

    The title of the course says it all, "Chord By Chord Blues Soloing".

    A different approach to soloing.

    Soloing "by chord", rather than "by scale".

    Then when you combine the two, look out.:whistle:
     
    #3 Paleo, Feb 10, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  4. Mr.Scary

    Mr.Scary A Blues Legend in My Own Mind

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    Ok-I didn't mean scale , I meant Arpeggio. Not getting which one to use where.
     
  5. Paleo

    Paleo Work?

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    You use the one of the chord you're on.
     
  6. Mr.Scary

    Mr.Scary A Blues Legend in My Own Mind

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    Still don't get it. There are 9 arpeggios. Can I play any of them over any chord.
     
  7. Paleo

    Paleo Work?

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    Playing over a Dom7 chord you use a Dom7 arpeggio.

    Playing over a Major chord you use a Major arpeggio.

    etc,etc

    The arpeggio is the notes of the chord played one at a time. When you strum a chord you play them all together.

    They are the same notes. The notes of a chord.

    Strumming you can only play 6 notes at a time, with an arpeggio you can play any note of the chord within reach.

    There are as many arpeggios as there are chords. You're just playing the notes one at a time rather than all together.
     
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  8. OG_Blues

    OG_Blues Guitar Geezer

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    The concept is almost trivially simple (just like Paleo explained) so you must be overthinking it.
    Of course, actually using the simple concept is not as immediately trivial to implement - it takes practice.
    In the vast majority of "standard" blues, you are either playing over minor 7th or dominant 7th chords - the major 7th is very rare in blues, so you can ignore it for all practical purposes - Griff just included it for the sake of being complete - or if you want to start dabbling in jazzier chord progressions where the major 7th is actually more common than the others. The standard jazz II - V - I progression is often a minor 7th followed by a dominant 7th followed by a major 7th. e.g. Cm7 / F7 / Bbmaj7
    Use the arpeggio as a basic framework on which to add other notes of the scale that "work" over that chord as well as standard embellishments as slides, bends, etc to add blues flavor. I find this "additive" approach very effective. Playing ONLY the arpeggios (notes of the chord) will pretty much sound like you are just playing the chords one note at a time, because, well, that is exactly what you are doing.
    I found it very helpful to plot out the arpeggios using Neck Diagrams in order to gain a better mind's eye picture of what's going on. Then plot out on top of that the other possible notes and embellishments to add. I wish Griff would have included that kind of visual in the course as well, but it's always highly instructional to work out stuff like that for yourself too.
     
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  9. Paleo

    Paleo Work?

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    I'll also point out that Griff explains all this in the introduction, especially the last 2 paragraphs.

    If the progression in not a 12 bar blues, you can simply use the notes of each chord without having to analyze anything. You don't even have to know the key!!!

    If it is a 12-bar, you can combine the arpeggios with the scales and licks you already know (as OG also states). Grif discusses this further in Lesson 11: "Making Music From The Exercises".
     
  10. Paleo

    Paleo Work?

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    One last comment.

    If, for example, you have a Major chord in a progression:

    You can play the Major chord in any of the 5 CAGED chord shapes. Which voicing you use is entirely up to you.

    Once you decide, then you simply play the notes of the chord one at a time.

    Same for any chord of any type in any progression. Decide where to play it, then play the notes one at a time.

    Of course just playing an arpeggio up and down is no more musical than just playing a scale up and down.;)
     
    #10 Paleo, Feb 11, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  11. Mr.Scary

    Mr.Scary A Blues Legend in My Own Mind

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    Thanks for the help. Maybe once I get as little farther in it will make more sense. You're explanation had helped though