What Is He Doing Here

Discussion in 'General Music & Guitar Learning' started by ChrisG, Nov 28, 2018.

  1. Scotty R

    Scotty R Blues Newbie

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    Nice to get the YouTube link.... When played back at 75% or slower it's easier to hear the rhythm, the licks and it doesn't seem so intimidating.
     
  2. JN99

    JN99 Hang Fire

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    There is a TON of mileage to be had in box 1, SRV was a master at it. There's a video/lesson that Anthony Stauffer does where he shows an entire song of Stevie Ray's (don't recall the song now) and what he's playing on a fretboard graphic and it's 90% in box one - I was amazed. Of course, it was Stevie Ray but the point is there is a lot more music to be made without ever leaving box one than we may realize.
     
  3. Griff

    Griff Chief Cook And Bottle Washer
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    95% of the intro solo to Texas Flood is the 4 note solo pattern... ALL of Little Wing is boxes 1 and 2... ALL of Riviera Paradise is boxes 1 and 2 (mostly box 1 in most cases.)

    This is why I tell people that if you can't make music with 1 or 2 patterns, you don't need more patterns :)
     
  4. OG_Blues

    OG_Blues Guitar Geezer

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    Some observations.
    Suppose you have a guitar with 24 frets. Most of you probably don't, but 24 frets gives us a worst case analysis.
    This provides an instrument with a maximum range of 4 octaves.
    Take ANY position on the neck spanning 4 frets, and that spans 2 octaves + 3 semi-tones - more than half of the total range of the instrument!!
    Note that from any position, if you move your hand up 4 more frets, you have only added 4 additional frequencies / notes that you didn't have in the lower 4 fret position. Big deal.
    What a crazy instrument.
     
  5. OG_Blues

    OG_Blues Guitar Geezer

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    It struck me that this is all largely a matter of perspective. I recall many years ago when Riviera Paradise first came out, I was taking lessons from a very good player locally - he could play any style from classical to country to blues, rock, flamenco - you name it - he could play it, and play it well. I commented to him how much I loved that song and SRV's playing style. His comment back was that Riviera Paradise only served to demonstrate SRV's "limitations". At the time I didn't understand his point. Now, when I look at a transcription of it, I clearly understand his point, but at the same time, he was really missing something very important, which is:
    You don't need to get all fancy to communicate emotion in music.
     
  6. Griff

    Griff Chief Cook And Bottle Washer
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    I could not agree more. As a younger, more educated but less wise, man, I would have likely agreed with him. I've very much changed my tune in that department over the years.

    But here's what is funny, doing something like using an E minor pentatonic scale over an F Major 7 chord (which I believe happens in that tune) could be labelled as super fancy and avante garde if you look at it from another instrument's perspective. A horn player would almost NEVER think to do that, but to Stevie it was a logical option. Maybe because he didn't know - or maybe because he did - we'll never know.