Overcoming frustration

Discussion in 'General Music & Guitar Learning' started by DavidLylis, Oct 11, 2019 at 4:16 AM.

  1. DavidLylis

    DavidLylis Blues Newbie

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    Although I am generally satisfied with my progress, I think we all fall into that pit of frustration. Even Jimmy Page wanted to throw his guitar out the window. For inspiration, I watched BB King videos and was moved that he can't play and sing at the same time and does vibrato with only his index finger. There is hope))
     
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  2. paparaptor

    paparaptor Central Scrutinizer
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    If you're breathing, there's always hope! [​IMG]
     
  3. sdbrit68

    sdbrit68 Student Of The Blues

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    You know, I find the frustration is usually doing the same thing over and over...............I believe, dont know, thats why so many of us have multiple courses.

    I use the penatonic mastery 5 days a week, and do one exercise through each section, then I move on to something else.

    An example, Monday, I learn new licks, and practice them tuesday and wednesday, Sundays, I work on riffs to learn songs

    @Griff has said multiple times, and I may not say it the same, dont wait for perfection, get it down good enough and move on and learn. You will continue improving on the other stuff
     
  4. JPsuff

    JPsuff Satisfaction is complacency

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    Sometimes the best way to overcome frustration is to simply walk away and do something else for a while.

    I can't tell you how many times I have " hit a wall" with something and the more I try, the higher and thicker the wall gets.
    But if I walk away -- for a day or two or even a week or more -- I come back and can suddenly play better than ever.

    Sometimes you just need to reboot.
     
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  5. Elio

    Elio Student Of The Blues

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    I can't agree enough with this. Learning something new is usually nonlinear and much more of a complex process than we realize. I don't know how many times I have worked on something and felt as though I was spinning my wheels and making no progress. And then, after putting it down for a while and working on something else, it suddenly clicks when I come back to it. The combination of objective stress-free reflection combined with having picked up some improvements in speed and accuracy from another exercise create the pathway needed to get there. It is important to maintain consistent focus on clear objectives, but it is also important to have some variety in how you get there.

    I think that much of the time, there are just mental blocks that we create and fall into. Earlier in the year, I decided to do Griff's "The Foreman" course, which is a cool Freddie King type instrumental. At the slower speed I consistently tripped up on a lick that is really not particularly difficult. For some reason I could slow it way down and walk it through perfectly, but every time I got to it at a faster speed with the backing track I would very consistently mangle it. I got some feedback from Griff and then put it down and sort of forgot about it. Now, about 6 months later I've decided to try to get it all the way up to full speed to submit as an AAP Fixit. This week I tried it at very close to full speed and sailed through that lick perfectly without thinking about it. In fact, I honestly can't even remember what about it was such a problem in the first place. The combination of everything I've worked on since then, along with not having the anxiety about goofing it up made it a slam dunk.
     
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  6. JPsuff

    JPsuff Satisfaction is complacency

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    Variety.
    That's the key!

    I love Blues but I enjoy a variety of genres: Fusion Jazz because of its complexity and musicianship, Progressive Rock for its dynamics, and even "Hair Band" stuff for its sonic extravagance and I enjoy playing to all of that.
    For me it's all about expanding horizons and trying different things and when I come back to Blues, I find that many of the things I've discovered in other genres can be applied to Blues in varying ways which makes for more interesting phrasing.

    Take Griff, for example.
    He's a shredder from back-in-the-day when he played a lot of Metal and it shows in his Blues playing. He combines a variety of chordal and single-note phrasings that are very "Metal-ish" while working his way towards a classic Blues resolve. In fact he and Albert Cummings have similar styles in that regard.
    Or take the guy from the "All-Stars" (the only one with hair). I watched him comping to a B.B. tune they played and it was almost entirely 9ths and 7ths with some augmentations scattered throughout. Now tell me that man is not a Jazz player, yet here he was playing in a Blues band.

    All of that Variety makes things interesting.

    I'm certainly no shredder and what I know about guitar could fit in a thimble, but for me, and to this day, one of the best solos I ever came up with in the VJR (if I may take a moment to pat myself on the back), wasn't for a Blues tune at all but rather for something called "Funky Rock in Em". Yet it was all of the things I learned about Blues combined with all of the exploration of other genres that allowed me to come up with the phrasings and dynamics for that tune and I know for a fact that I could never have done that if all I ever played was I - IV - V all the time.

    If you really listen to some of the best Blues players out there, you'll hear a lot more than just "Blues phrasings" but rather a wide palette of styles, parts of which have been adapted to create the sound they have.
     
  7. Elwood

    Elwood mushin

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    I agree that we need variety, for a variety of reasons. I listen to and love stuff from Smetna to Scruggs, I like to play at blues, country, jazz, funk, and some rock (actually lots). I never developed and ear for metal, or whatever is the source of those annoying thumps emitting from some cars. And learning is a mystery, for me at least. Otherwise why wouldn't it work the same all the time?

    Consistency keeps the wheels on things for me. Every possible day I sit and run the same routine, with a metronome, for around 20 minutes. (These are my bad habits folks) I run the 5 boxes, in G, up and down at least a few times, at 4 speed settings from 50 to 80. Then I step through the little chord shapes for the 7ths. this is all Griff stuff, not the way he means it to be used for sure. I don't do this to get better, I do it so I have a chance to play. This time assures that my fingers will move when and where they are needed, helps maintain my fingertips, helps with ear training, and just kinda "keeps me in the saddle" so to speak.
    This is like a "no goal" time. No pressure. I put in the time. On a good day I can daydream, or problem solve if you wish, and hear the patterns run in the background. (loose the concentration-connection and crash hard - start over :) ) Anyway, this is how I stay in the game with my instruments, and my peace of mind. Since my goal is totally achievable, just sit and do it, I don' have to decide. How I feel, what's going on, none of that matters. I will eek out a few minutes to spend with one of my friends. If that helps me get better, fine. Sorta Zen time.

    I also just sit and play, if I can...time and all getting in the way. And now with an amazing amount of coaching I try to record and play vjr, wow.

    Now, if I just worked on learning I'd be crazy as hell in no time. I put too much pressure on myself.
    If the solution was as easy as buying a guitar, or tossing one out the window, that wouldn't be any fun!
     
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  8. Crossroads

    Crossroads Thump the Bottom

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    I take a much simpler approach. I refuse to allow myself to get frustrated. If I fall short I use it as learning experience and analyze what is it that I'm not doing, that I should be doing or vice versa.
    I developed a a plan to achieve my goals. They are definitive and measurable.
    Execute the plan.
    Analyze the results.
    Adjust the plan as necessary to achieve stated goals.
    Emotion is saved for rehearsal and performance. For me anyway, negative emotions have no place in practice or analyzing my current skill set. I find it just gets in the way. YMMV
     
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