The C7 Grip Chord

This is a short video today (I think it’s under 3 minutes) but it’s one of my favorite chord shapes and I so rarely see it used!

I hope you can help end the suffering and bring this poor, under utilized chord shape out into the light of the world…

Download this video – MP4 | WMV

38 Comments

  • Robyn

    Reply Reply December 4, 2017

    THIS IS WHAT I LOVE ABOUT YOUR EMAILS Griff. Useful information. Thank you.

  • Dave

    Reply Reply December 4, 2017

    Cool man, cool.

    Dave in the Adirondacks

  • Deb

    Reply Reply December 3, 2017

    The Beatles used 7th chords often. Can’t By Me Love is an example, the song begins with C7, most songs do not begin with 7th chords!

  • D K

    Reply Reply December 3, 2017

    All good stuff. Thanks

  • Brad Whittaker

    Reply Reply December 2, 2017

    Hey Griff

    I have used that C7th on the 5th fret, but then I go into a F shape on the same fret, then slide that F down 2 frets , not sure what those chords are but they seem to sound good and play easy !!!!

  • Michael Chappell

    Reply Reply December 2, 2017

    Great refresher and the C7, D7 and E7 are all my favourites. I like what Chris Gardner says about leaving the open E to get the great D9 sound.

    I even use these with break ups (Muting the Strings in between the beats).

    I would like to wish you Griff & Laura and family all a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year 2018 and us all playing the guitar with the Blues Guitar Unleashed Family into next year 2018.

    Michael-Sydney-Australia 3rd December 2017

  • J

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Thanks for doing the do in a very understandable way.

  • david moon

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Good reminder- I don’t use that shape enough. Mostly the barred E and A shapes, and the 9th

  • Roy

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    I thought this was FROWNED upon by the pros as a lazy short cut? One of the first shapes I learned in the early-mid 60s!

  • Mike

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Another great little lesson. I’m surprised that it would be more uncommonly used than the 5th string bar-chord though. I’ve always found it much easier to grab since, open-C is the first chord shape I learned and then it was just a matter of training the pinkie. Nothing for my brain and fingers to get crossed-up on. I still have trouble grabbing the closed-C7 position.
    I also use the other 7th shape… I call it the B7 shape, a lot for the 5th-string rooted 7th chords. It’s essentially the same chord shape but using the middle finger on the root instead of the ring-finger.

  • Chaplain Ed

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Thanks Griff. Knew it was there but you helped me see it in a new light.

  • Robin

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    yes I love that chord and I personally use that shape also for D7

  • Rohn

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    great chord been using it for ages. great sound if u dont know it learn it lol. I learned this from the B7 chord 1 fret down from it
    always look forward to your emails Griff
    Rohn

  • Jim

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Griff;
    I use that chord configuration very frequently but as a barre chord so I can switch between the major and 7th chords quickly, and akso don’t need to worry about nulling the 1st & 6th strings. I’ve been doing that for decades and didn’t realize it was anything unusual. As always, Griff, a great video. Thanks!

  • Robert

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    In the E7 position why can’t you play the low E string.

    • Richard White

      Reply Reply December 1, 2017

      you can play all 6 strings on a E7

      • Robert

        Reply Reply December 1, 2017

        I always do play the E bass string I was wonder why Grif said not to.Thanks Richard

  • Jos Dvidson

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    I use it all the time, all over the neck. I learned it from Steve Miller, back in thew 60’s when I played in his band, Steve Miller & the Ardells.

  • Tom W

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Seems that could be useful for the 13 – 7 – 9 progressions in Rockabilly tunes.

  • Jim

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Yes! A true blues sound! I was taught this shape years ago, as a turnaround (D7-D#7-E7). Very authentic old blues sound!
    A MUST know chord! Great tip, Griff!

  • Frank Marino

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    This chord shape is a staple in my playing. You can also use your ring finger to grab the alternating counter bass note on the 6th string for a country sound. Thanks Griff for all your teaching!

  • Chris Gardner

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    So glad you brought this to light. It’s that wonderful staccato choppy chord (an E7 using the C7 shape at fret 5) in Keep on running by Spencer Davis. At fret 3, include the open top E string to get a great D9, especially tasteful when fingerpicked. I use the shape in our bands rendering of Amy Winehouse’s Rehab. It’s a breeze to make a run up from the fifth below on the bottom E string to the root. C7 as demonstrated, then a G7 at fret 10, with an F7 at fret 8. Easy to change to a 9th, 7#9 etc in jazzy progressions, with minimum effort.

  • Paul Barbers

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Hi Griff
    Great tuition as always show in a manner anyone can understand.
    C7 opens She was just 17
    another classic,one of many
    Keep on with lessons.

  • Paul Wilson- white from England

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Hi Griff,
    I’m one of your students and I use it all the time and 9 th chords,who plays blues with bar chords as there is no need when there is little chords plus there inversions all over the neck.also totally agree this chord sounds great better than a bar chord IMO.but great job bringing this chord to people’s attention see you in the USA next year

  • Bill

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    D7 and C7 figure prominently in The Beatles (Harrison’s) Taxman. Great chord.

  • Lego G E 47

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    In the song by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, “Slick” from the LP THE BEAT OF THE BRASS the guitarist John Pisano uses this chord shape

  • Tom Hopsicker

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Yep, you featured that in the Tore Down lesson in BGU. Lesson 6 in the original BGU. Like most, I don’t use it enough, so I’ll do my best to change that.

  • mike z.

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Griff , thanks for showing us this chord . Sounds so good , and also is not that difficult . Thank you , Mike Z

  • Iain

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    John Lennon used this a lot. You can see it in old films.

  • Tim

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    you can also play the 5th of the chord on the 6th string

  • Tim

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    One of my favourites which I have used for years. Particularly for progressions from #9 down to 9 down to b9 to the 7th descent on the 2nd string.

  • George aubrey

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Credence did a whole song with this chord (Born On the Bayou ). Such a great sound.

  • Keith

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Good lesson! I’ve been using this chord shape for longer than I care to mention, but only recently started using the barre chord equivalent. I guess I figured that, since I use it, everybody knows about it…..

  • Denny Mac

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    One of my favourite chord shapes. Surprising to hear that it is not commonly used.

  • Mark

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    A shape SRV used to use quite a bit I think. Especially as E7. Wish I understood how this shape works across all the strings. (ie it’s D7 across the first three strings next to the nut) and seems to work all over the fretboard. Never worked it out – back to the chord books. Great work as ever Griff.

  • cowboy

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    I really like this chord and use it a lot…makes for an easy turnaround…and a nice variation from the 9th…later.

    cowboy

  • Jameskostan

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    I use it often but not enough

  • Margie Dyson

    Reply Reply December 1, 2017

    Yea! Something I can actually do!

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